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do to achieve specific ends part of their goal in foreign policy and national security policy. that's what public diplomacy is supposed to do. now, if everybody loved us, it may be easier to achieve those goals, but it's really hard to get everybody to love us. that's a long term project, and generally, a futile project. it's much more important to do as president obama said right in the beginning from the inaugural speech that we need to focus on mutual interest and mutual respect, and there are many things that we can get done in that fashion. i think that discretionary -- diplomacy 230e cueses on specific, strategic goals, and if it failed in any way in the last several decades, it's been that it's not focused on those goals. >> i'm in agreement with jim on this issue. it's note a population contest, but it's absolutely the wrong -- the results are not great results if that's the measurement. one of the things that we tried to do, again, building on the base that jim and his team put in place was to be sure that everything we were doing in public diplomacy actually was designed t
adult cancer. onid cameron's speech foreign policy at the lord mayor's annual banquet. this will be his third time speaking at a banquet since becoming prime minister in 2010. join us for his remarks at 3:30 p.m. eastern. later at georgetown university, musician and activist bono talks about social enterprise and social movements, like his project red campaign. our coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. eastern. >> 2013 should be the year we begin to solve our debt through tax reform and entitlement reform. i am proposing that we avert the fiscal cliff together in a manner that ensures that 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with a major problem -- the major problems that are facing us. >> i am open to compromise, i am open to new ideas, i am committed to solving our fiscal challenge. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me making over $250,000 are not asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the newly elected congress starts work in janua
security challenges and the foreign policy challenges we face, i say that the number one challenge is getting our fiscal house in order. getting a handle on the debt, getting a handle on the deficit which are critical in order to get the economy growing again and people back to work. and i think that is the over -- it's certainly the number one domestic challenge. my point is it's always the number one national security challenge. why? because a healthy economy and a healthy balance sheet undergirds everything we do internationally. it funds our military, it gives strength to our diplomacy, it allows us to be an attractive trading partner which gives us economic influence. it undergirds everything we do overseas. but secondly, it also undergirds the power of the american idea. the american idea is political democracy and free markets makes for a stable situation in the long term but also makes for a prosperous society that is able to deliver on its people. that is really what america has stood for. and by our failure to resolve our own problems and get our economy growing and going
to be resolved around a more foreign policy guidance. the way it works now, let's change, since my day, is we used to sit down with people from the state department usually the deputy secretary, once or twice here and say what's on your mind, what you think of the important countries we should be concentrating on? i hope that when i was undersecretary there was more conversation, but there's no real guidance. and i think that there needs to be. the second thing there needs to be absolutely is a we organization of the bbg. the bbg has now have agency. there's no ceo eric one of the strangest organizations in all of the federal government. the board itself is the head of agency, and the chair really has no more power than any of the other governors. it's kind of a zion to run the show. and by the way, i'm not sure, as the chair, the new chair -- >> nominated. >> nominate, that's all. this is the way that administration's and congress treat this organization, where more money spent on public diplomacy as far as we know them in any other program. doesn't even have a full complement of governors.
still, president obama, i think, has been cautious with foreign policy, we have a divided government, and we have to take care of the fiscal cliff that's looming, and that's the first order of business. not making any predigses, but i think it's just useful to see where we are, and i think the election results do have implications for some of the concerns that we outlined in the report. i'll turn it over to peter, manuel, and margaret for their summary remarks. >> thank you. great introduction. let me start, and, in fact, i want to focus on the visit at the end of the month which will really be the first major opportunity to see the extent to which the election has had any keep of impact on the way the u.s. is thinking about latin america or the way that latin america thinks about the u.s.. it's an important meeting for both presidents k become somewhat routine now for the president-elect of mexico to come toñ&r the united states bee the inauguration. calderÓn did, and i don't remember back further, but -- >> [inaudible] >> i was too young then. [laughter] in any event, the visit,
-- important foreign policy issues. we'll also be joined at the half hour by terry o'neill president of the national organization for women. again, take your calls at 1-866-55-press. let's get right into it. and starting with david petraeus and what that's all about. but first -- >> this is the "full court press." >> other headlines -- >> bill: slow down. >> other headlines making news on this monday, ashley judd responded to rumors over the weekend that she's considering a run for senate against mitch mcconnell in kentucky in 2014. >> bill: go, go, go! >> the actor telling "us weekly" magazine she's hannered people have approached her about running but she's not ready to think about it just yet saying we just came out of an election. everyone's focus should be on coming together now and moving forward. she was an active supporter of the president on the campaign trail and has not ruled the senate run out completely. >> bill: i would love to see her or anybody challenge mitch mcconnell. that would be as good as gettin
in foreign policy appetite in national security both on the part of the two parties and on the part of the american public. what do i mean when i say that? there is no appetite for another land war in asia or continuing the land war in asia we have in afghanistan and we saw in the concluded presidential campaigns that the candidate who had a wing of the party pushing to take the view we should be in afghanistan longer, that we should do more, something militarily in iran but continually pushed away from that by the more politically minded wing of the party reading internal polling that says there's not much difference on afghanistan between republicans and democrats so you don't have the demand side for the kind of military spending we have seen over the last decade and no longer have public outcry from military spending as a response to terrorism. the second point related to that which is a two edged sword is the public believes that there are cheaper technological solutions to our national security problem and the most obvious exponents of this is drones and other remote wrote --
.i.a. then former senator evan bayh on the fiscal cliff. then senior editor of foreign policy magazine will be on. ♪ host: good morning, welcome to "washington journal." the fbi investigation that led to the resignation of general david petraeus has expanded to general john allen. the impact of all this on the intelligence community and national security will be part of several hearings on capitol hill later this week. lawmakers return to washington today amid a shake-up of the president obama national security team, facing the looming issue of the so-called fiscal cliff. that is where we want to begin today this morning. president obama will meet later on with labor leaders who are insisting that the president not compromise on cuts to medicare and social security. what is your take on this? avoiding this -- avoiding the fiscal cliff? host: remember, you can send us a clear message, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail, journal@c-span.org. courtesy of the newseum, washington, front page of that newspaper and many of the newspapers this morning, including "the washington post,"
control. president obama, i think, has been shown to be pretty cautious when it comes to foreign policy. we still have a divided government and we also have to take care of this fiscal cliff that is looming, and that is the first order of business. not making any predictions, but i think it is just useful to see where we are and i do think the election results to have implications for some of the concerns that we outlined in this report. i will turn it over to peter and then market and manuel. >> thank you. a good introduction. let me start -- i want to focus on the opinion yet to visit at the end of this month, which will really be the first major opportunity to see the extent to which the election really has had any kind of impact on the way the u.s. is thinking about latin america or the way that latin america is thinking about the u.s.. this is an important meeting for both presidents. it has become somewhat routine now with the president elect of mexico to come to the u.s. before the inauguration. calderÓn did, foxx did. i do not remember back farther than that, but anyhow -- i wa
not mind seing the united states gone. it's important when formulating foreign policy that the united states, particularly the obama administration, decide, are we going to be assisted with our own personal security issue here in the united states by the actions we take or are the re-- reactions that are going to be caused by our actions actually going to cause greater threats to our closest allies and to ourselves? unfortunately, that's what we're seeing. in fact, i had seen an article in may of 2010 that indicated that this administration, the obama administration, sided with israel's enemies in demanding that israel disclose any nuclear weapons. we had never sided with israel's enemies in trying to push israel into doing something against its own interests. when you're a very small country surrounded by countries that want to see you go away, it is important that they not know all of your defenses. going back in the old testament, you find history, king his kaija -- king hezekiah showing all the defenses they had in their armory he showed them to the leaders from babylon. as a resu
hill, the prime minister should make a speech about foreign-policy. let me say at the outset that this is a government that is outward looking, standing up for interest in the world, protecting security at home and promoting our values abroad. we spoke up for the arabs bring. we led international action to support the libyan people and getting rid of muammar gaddafi. we stepped up the use sanctions against iran, and at the forefront of efforts to isolate assad in syria. we've got us out of the bailout fund and rejecting the treaty that was not of interest. i am a prime minister who said even in tough economic times of britain will not break its promises to the poorest of our world. i am sharing the united nations high-level panel of development with ambition of eradicating absolute poverty in our world. i am a prime minister who will work closely with president obama in a renewed effort on the middle east peace process, and let us congratulate him tonight on winning a historic second term. yes, i am a prime minister who will -- you will bring troops home from afghanistan. let
" editorial page, she had a keen focus on foreign policy and in particular, really to to the issue of north korea human rights, like really no one else in the american media has taken. in her early career, melanie spent 10 years working for "the wall street journal" asia. in hong kong and before that had another gig, where she lived and worked in tokyo i believe. melanie received her bachelor's degree from princeton university and a master's degree from the university of toronto. the book that melanie is written is absolutely riveting. it really reads more like an tom clancy thriller than it does the work of nonfiction. she tells an incredibly powerful story about human rights and human tragedy the earliest modern north korea. she tells the story through the eyes of many of the participants in this drama. the refugees, one of whom, joseph can come into today, one of only 175, 180 north korean refugees who actually made it to the united states and safety. she tells the story through the eyes of the workers on the underground railroad, largely people involved in christian relief organizations
has been shown to be pretty cautious when it comes to foreign policy and we still have a divided government and we also have to take care of this fiscal cliff for swimming and that's not making any predictions, but it's just useful to see where we are and the election results do have implications for some of the concerns we outlined in this report. i think i'll turn it over to computer for remarks. >> michael, good introduction. let me start -- in fact, i went to showcase the end of this month. it will really be the first major opportunity to see the extent to which the election really has had any kind of impact on the way the u.s. is thinking about that america was the way that lack america is thinking about the u.s. this is an important meeting for both presidents. it has become somewhat routine now that the president elect of mexico to come to the united states before the inauguration. calderon did, fox did. i don't remember back further than that, but i was too young then. in any event, the visit itself opens up just a huge number of opportunities that probably existed -- i d
, economic, and fiscal issues. host: let's go to foreign policy because "the washington times" as this headline -- scott wilson, do you expect that he does that? troops on the ground? guest: i do not expect troops on the grand. as far as the president would go in syria, the next step is some kind of a no-fly zone. you will start seeing the model that he put in place and advocated for in libya. he is someone who moves incrementally. the next real step is the first plunge into military would be directly harming the rebels. they do not know the rebels that well. they do not want to start sending heavy weapons to groups that are clearly influenced by islamists. that has been one caution. the next step would be considering some kind of international no-fly zone like what took place in libya. host: iran pose a nuclear program? do we know what he might do? guest: i think in terms of old assertions of next steps, some of that may wait for the next secretary of state. this is something that the next secretary of state would be shepherding through and then stick it in somebody else's la
: let's go to foreign policy because "the washington times" as this headline -- scott wilson, do you expect that he does that? troops on the ground? guest: i do not expect troops on the grand. as far as the president would go in syria, the next step is some kind of a no-fly zone. you will start seeing the model that he put in place and advocated for in libya. he is someone who moves incrementally. the next real step is the first plunge into military would be directly harming the rebels. they do not know the rebels that well. they do not want to start sending heavy weapons to groups that are clearly influenced by islamists. so that has been one caution. then the next step would likely be considering some sort of international no-fly zone like what took place in libya. host: iran's nuclear program? do we know what he might do? guest: i think in terms of old assertions of next steps, some of that may wait for the next secretary of state. this is something that the next secretary of state would be shepherding through and then stick it in somebody else's lap. it is probably strategically
director and i'm delighted to see all of you here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of other presidential election is certainly evident by the standing room only crowd that we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition. transition even with the same president. transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the presidential cycle to have an impact on the policy process. and so i'm, i take it, as a good sign there is so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now i think that the transition from a first to a second obama administration may of course begin the day after an election but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the president's new or old team takes shape and where necessary seeks confirmation. as the new old team goes through the inevitable period of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities, and as other issues, domestic issues, fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and let's not forget as the world recalibrate
consumption led growth model. >> and is it going to comatethe perhaps its biggest and foreign policy challenge will be the middle east, is going to potentially be iran? >> absolutely. what can we do make them be more constructive there, not support iran, but to lead to a change there. >> phil, thanks for that. he's written loads of books. let's show where you we stand with the u.s. futures right now ahead of this particular market. right new pretty flat the open for the s&p 500. the nasdaq is around five points above fair value and at the moment, we are five points below fair value for the dow. so looks fairly flat. european stocks down most of the session. bond yeeds certainyields certai looking at. >> if we look at the bond space, we can get a sense of why the italian ten year, this is the one to watch breaching the 5% level today. it has come down a little bit from the session high. perhaps indicating something of a floor below the market levels that we're seeing this morning. but certainly one to watch as we continue to gauge fallout across the eurozone as to whether greece ahead of budget
administration foreign policy. do you see anywhere in the world where we are better off or where we are viewed as a stronger, more powerful nation than we were when barack obama first took office? >> absolutely to the contrary. the fact of the matter is, when america has very strong leadership, the world is a safer and a better place. when american leadership is indecisive or paralyzed by fear of consequence, which we have had a lot of, the world is a much more dangerous place. that's what you get from our allies in the region, particularly in those areas where our values and our national interests are being contested as they are in the middle-east. they all fundamentally believe the united states policy is to pull away from them and to disengage. they are terrified by the prospects of an advancing iran, and an advancing al qaeda and affiliated groups with a weakened united states, as a player. >> when you look at the issue of nuclear proliferation, as well, ambassador, iran is a concern. but you look across the region and the extent to which you will have other nations, clearly attempting to
as much oil as it does currently, perhaps for energy to be such a focal point of its foreign policy won't be so large. and already you have exactly within the oil and gas industry pushing the case for shale on the basis that it would save the country a lot of money on overseas military expenditure. >> if you take in that oil, shale gas together, how much is that revolutionizing the american economy and also the global gas and oil industry itself? >> we're already seeing some big impacts in terms of when you see home consumers shifting from diesel to heat their homes in the u.s. to gas, we've seen a lot of shifting and that's certainly impacted oil demand in the u.s. but perhaps the real game changer could be yet to come. there is a lot of talk about natural gas vehicles. we're already seeing moves on that. the figures that the iea is putting out today, these really don't take in a major shift towards natural gas as a transportation fuel. p but a lot of people in the u.s. are predicting this could happen and that's on the basis oil remains reasonably expensive and gas is very cheap. if t
reality. now second, there has, in fact, been a significant shift in foreign policy appetite and national security appetite, both on the part of the two parties, and on the part of the american public. and what do we mean when i say that? there is no appetite for another land war in asia, and there's no appetite for a continuing to lead were in asia that we've still got in afghanistan. and we just saw in the concluded presidential campaign that the candidate who had a wing of his party clergy pledging them to take the view that we should be in afghanistan longer, that we should do more in syria, that we should do something militarily and iran was continually pushed away from that by the more political politically minded wing of his party that was reading an internal polling which said, there's not much difference particularly on afghanistan it when republicans and democrats. so you don't have the demand side, if you will for the kind of military spending that we've seen over the last decade. you know longer have a public outcry for military spending on this scale as a response to terroris
and security a center of u.s. foreign policy debate. this was hosted by the center for strategic and international studies. >> let me take a employment to welcome and introduce admiral fallon skipping the part how he walked across the tidal basin to get here today. he's a very, very dear friend. he's had senior commands. he was, of course, the head of the central command, was the head of the pacific command. he was instrumental in opening up our relations with china and establishing new relations with india. he is in every sense the, you know, the diplomat warrior, what we most admire in our unified combat and commanders. thank you, bill, to you, for doing this, and let's turn it over to you. >> thank you. [applause] thank you very much. [applause] first big step. thank you very much, and welcome, ladies and gentlemen. while we're getting settled here, i'll have our panelists come up and get settled into their chairs and order dessert, and those of you who missed the chow line, it may be too late. [laughter] then, again, i don't think too many in this room are starving, not the s
bernstein, foreign economic policy adviser to vice president biden and senior fellow at the center on budget and policy priorities and wilbur ross is joining in with us, too, he's sticking around because we begged him too. we'll have more from all of them in a moment. first andrew has your morning headlines. >> we've got some earnings news this morning, dow component walmart reporting third quarter profit of $1.08 per share, one cent above estimates. revenues were light and full year forecast falling below street consensus. walmart saying an internal investigation has unveiled allegations of foreign corruption practices act in three more countries, so we're going to add china, india and brazil to the list, the issue first surfaced regarding walmart's mexico operation and there was an sec -- >> i had said before the company said in the release it's been informed by the doj and sec it's been the subject of investigation into possible violations of the foreign corrupt policies act, but it's the brazil, china and india aspects that changed the story a little. >> so the earnings plus that news pu
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)